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Thanksgiving Break, NOV. 23-25: Classes Canceled, Offices Closed.:

The Max Chambers Library will be open 7:30 a.m.-10 p.m., Nov. 22., 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Nov. 23 and will be closed Nov. 24-26. The Wellness Center will be closed Nov. 23-27 and will resume normal hours Nov. 28.

CDC Monkeypox Updates and Information

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Monkeypox is a rare disease caused by infection with the monkeypox virus. The virus is part of the same family of viruses as the variola virus, which causes smallpox. Monkeypox is not related to chickenpox. Monkeypox symptoms are similar to smallpox symptoms but milder, and monkeypox is rarely fatal.

Monkeypox spreads in a few ways through close, personal, and often skin-to-skin contact. Monkeypox is not considered a sexually transmitted disease, but it is often transmitted through close, sustained physical contact, which can include sexual contact. If you or a partner has monkeypox or think you may have monkeypox, the best way to protect yourself and others is to avoid any type of physical contact. 

On Aug. 4, 2022, the U.S. government declared monkeypox a public health emergency due to rising cases nationwide. The CDC offers information and resources related to monkeypox on its website, including information on how you can protect yourself and prevent spreading the virus.

If you think you have monkeypox, do not come to campus. Contact the Oklahoma State Department of Health Epi-on-Call at 405-426-8710 for a free confidential consultation or your health care provider for advice, testing and medical care. Self-isolate away from others to protect them from infection. If you live on campus, contact your hall director for quarantine arrangements. Cover all possible blisters (e.g., wearing clothing over the rash). Follow your health care provider’s instructions for treatment.

The CDC recommends vaccination for people who have been exposed to monkeypox and people who may be more likely to get monkeypox. Contact your health care provider or the Oklahoma State Department of Health to find out where the vaccine may be available locally. The university currently does not have access to monkeypox vaccinations.

Center for Disease Control and Prevention

FAQs About Monkeypox

What are the symptoms of monkeypox?

Monkeypox may cause fever and swollen lymph nodes. Headache, muscle and backache, chills and exhaustion may also be present. A painful rash develops and goes through several stages including fluid and pus-filled blisters that eventually get crusty, scab over and fall off.

Can monkeypox spread through sex?

Monkeypox can spread through any type of skin-to-skin contact with an infected person including, but not limited to, sexual contact. At this point, it is not known if the monkeypox virus will spread through bodily fluids. However, the rash can look like symptoms of

STIs such as herpes and syphilis. Mouth-to-skin contact can spread monkeypox when blisters are present. Condoms may not prevent the spread of monkeypox.

What should I do if I think I have monkeypox?

If you think you have monkeypox, contact the OSDH Epi-on-Call at 405-426-8710 for a free confidential consultation or your health care provider for advice, testing and medical care. Self-isolate away from others to protect them from infection. Cover all possible blisters (e.g., wearing clothing over the rash). 

What should I do if I am in contact with a confirmed monkeypox case?

Close contacts with someone who has monkeypox may be eligible for post-exposure vaccination to prevent illness. For close contact consultation, call the OSDH Epi-on-Call at 405-426-8710. Monitor yourself for symptoms for 21 days from exposure. If symptoms develop, self-isolate away from others and contact the OSDH Epi-on-Call or your health care provider for advice and testing.