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Important Update:

UCO requires all students, employees and visitors to wear a mask on campus when around others, both indoors and outdoors, and practice physical distancing of at least six feet when possible. If you or someone you know has COVID-19 symptoms, has been directly exposed to COVID-19 or has tested positive, fill out UCO's COVID-19 Self-Reporting form. To learn more about current operations, view the university's coronavirus webpage. View a list of UCO's virtual services.

Statement of Purpose

As the leader in arts education, artistic practice, and creative research, the UCO College of Fine Arts and Design believes the fine arts and design improve the overall quality of life. Moreover, CFAD believes the fine arts and design should be an integral component of higher education. Finally, CFAD believes the fine arts and design presented at UCO should display a high level of artistic quality enhancing and supporting the academic mission of ‘helping students learn.’

Artistic expression is a reflection of the society for, and by which, it is created. All art forms including dance, design, music, theatre, and the visual arts are protected under the First Amendment, which restricts the government’s right to censorship. Considering this, we recognize our campus and community is diverse, and individuals hold divergent and sensitive moral and socio-cultural concerns.

To that end, CFAD will ensure works of fine art and design created or selected for public presentation shall be acceptable to current standards and policies of the University; will be displayed and/or presented at an appropriate site on campus; and will not present an environmental, personal, or safety hazard to the campus or its community.

While CFAD promotes and supports the right of artistic expression on behalf of our faculty, staff, and students, the individual views and opinions conveyed through such artistic expression does not necessarily reflect the views, opinions, and position of the College of Fine Arts and Design.  

For more information on this CFAD policy please contact expression@uco.edu.

Performing Arts Public Awareness Statement

Art and Obscenity are both concepts that are subjective and often a point of debate. As a result, there may be content in this production that is objectionable to some viewers. We will make every effort to alert and inform our audiences of any content which may be offensive or objectionable. However, we urge you to use your own discretion before entering the theatre and viewing a production. 

Freedom of speech is the foundation of our communities and our nation. The works this institution exhibits may awe, illuminate, challenge, unsettle, confound, provoke, and, at times, offend. We defend the freedom to create content and exhibit such work, and we recognize the privilege of living in a country where creating, exhibiting and experiencing such work is a constitutional right.

To exhibit a production at the University of Central Oklahoma is not to endorse the work or the vision, ideals, and opinions of the playwright, director, designers or actors. It is to uphold the right of all to experience diverse ideas and viewpoints. If or when controversies arise from the exhibition of a production, we welcome public discussion and debate with the belief that such discussion is integral to the experience of the art. Consistent with our fundamental commitment to freedom of speech, however, we will not censor productions in response to political or ideological pressure.

Visual Arts Public Awareness Statement

Art and Obscenity are both concepts that are subjective and often a point of debate. As a result, there may be content in this gallery that is objectionable to some viewers. We urge you to use your own discretion before entering the space or viewing the work. 

The nude has historically been one of the central subjects of art, but it remains a subject of controversy and censorship in the United States. The beauty of the human body has inspired painters, photographers, sculptors and choreographers for many centuries. For hundreds of years there have been sculptures of nudes in many public spaces from Washington D.C. to the capitals of Europe. Nevertheless, exhibition spaces frequently decide to censor artwork-containing nudity so as to “protect children” from what some might think is “indecent,” or simply to avoid controversy. 

Freedom of speech is the foundation of our communities and our nation. The works this institution exhibits may awe, illuminate, challenge, unsettle, confound, provoke, and, at times, offend. We defend the freedom to create content and exhibit such work anywhere in the world, and we recognize the privilege of living in a country where creating, exhibiting, and experiencing such work is a constitutional right.

To exhibit a work of art is not to endorse the work or the vision, ideals, and opinions of the artist. It is to uphold the right of all to experience diverse visions and views. If or when controversies arise from the exhibition of a work of art, we welcome public discussion and debate with the belief that such discussion is integral to the experience of the art. Consistent with our fundamental commitment to freedom of speech, however, we will not censor exhibitions in response to political or ideological pressure.